The Happy Couple in the Throne Room after The Royal Wedding

Just how big was the #RoyalWedding this past Friday? An estimated 2 billion people tuned into the event. According to Akamai it was the sixth biggest event on the Web with just under 5.4 million page views a minute at the height of the event.

It was the first #RoyalWedding to take place since 2005. Just how has the Internet and Social Media changed since then? Well Facebook was one year old, YouTube was around for just two months and Twitter didn’t even exist.

Here are some other interesting measurements surrounding the Royal Wedding of Prince William and Catherine (Kate) Middleton, now known as the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.

NBC shared the following stats collected from Trendrr about the event specifically on Twitter. The LA Times had some additional information about how NBC intended to use social media and track the conversations surrounding the Royal Wedding.

  • 58% of Twitter conversations were of positive sentiment, 24% of tweets registered as neutral, and 18% were negative.
  • Women tweeted the most, 64% of tweets came from them vs. 36% from men.
  • 42% of all Royal Wedding related tweets came from Twitter.com while 39% came from mobile devices.

Specifically looking at the hashtags and top influencers during the event the following stats were shared.

  • Mentions of the #RoyalWedding hashtag topped 1 million by mid-ceremony.
  • Top hashtags include #royalwedding, #rw2011 (the officially Royal Wedding hashtag), #royalwedding!, #rw11, and #bodareal (which is Spanish for “#royalwedding”)
  • According to Klout, the top influencers included @nytimes, @eonline and @andersoncooper.

Webtrends also did a great job pulling together pre-Royal Wedding and post-Royal Wedding infographics to summarize the online conversations. Highlights include:

  • 2.7 million social media mentions in 24 hours.
  • The U.S. generated the majority of the buzz according to Webtrends, as 55.8% of conversations originated there, compared to 1.69% in the U.K.

Note: Photo courtesy of The British Monarchy on Flickr